Motive discussion of cassius and brutus

For let the gods so speed me as I love The name of honor more than I fear death. I, ii As explained in the thematic discussion there is much in the way of political dilemmas in the play.

Motive discussion of cassius and brutus

Motive discussion of cassius and brutus

He even has come to be compared with one of the greatest of Shakespearean villains, Iago. On account of his manipulative abilities and his jealous motives, such a comparison is justified. On the other hand, when contrasted with Iago Cassius shows himself as no consistent villain.

Cassius is also a tragic figure. Unlike Iago, who succeeds in his plots until he is caught, Cassius fails in the execution his treachery. The fatal flaw that leads to this failure is his continuous submission to Brutus. By combing both villainous and tragic elements, Shakespeare forms a tragic villain hybrid in the character of Cassius.

This examination will reveal his persuasive abilities and his jealous motives.

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This discussion ought to produce the realization that, just like other tragic figures, he fails because of a tragic flaw. We will conclude with a comment regarding the impact such a hybrid character has on the play as a whole.

An able villain treats his treachery as an art form. The villain has a set purpose and will do anything to achieve it. If possible, he or she will use other characters to accomplish this purpose. Although not always necessary, a villain often has deep motives of envy or revenge.

Iago embodies all of the above qualities. His purpose is to ruin both of these men by bringing Cassio to dishonor and tempting Othello to kill his wife Desdemona.

Iago is quite able to manipulate nearly everyone in the play to accomplish these aims. Cassius also displays the above characteristics.

Cassius Vs Brutus Essays

He aims to have Caesar eliminated at any cost. Just as Iago works behind the scenes, so too does Cassius encourage the conspirators to rally around Brutus. Not only do Iago and Cassius both match the profile of a typical villain, they also share specific techniques of persuasion.

For instance, Iago uses politeness to gain confidence from Othello Gilbert By the use of such respectful attitudes he is able to more aptly allure his honorable prey. Cassius too showers Brutus and others with honor and compliments.

Through this irony Iago hides his real intentions.Explain why Brutus believes that with his and Cassius' deaths, the ghost of Caesar can rest in peace. The catastrophe of tragedy occurs with the final failure and death of the hero.

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Explain. Cassius sees Brutus as the catalyst that will unite the leading nobles in a conspiracy, and he makes the recruitment of Brutus his first priority. Ironically, his success leads directly to a continuous decline of his own influence within the republican camp.

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ESSAYS, term and research papers available for UNLIMITED access Motive Discussion of Cassius and Brutus One of these decisions established what.

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Motive Discussion of Cassius and Brutus specifically for you. for only $/page. Order Now. Both men feel that Caesar is not best for Rome, but both men see a different reason for why he should be killed.

On one hand, Cassius believes he should be killed because he was a member of the first triumvirate, and wanted Caesar’s position of power. Cassius then desperately laments he is "hated by one he loves," jealously accuses Brutus of loving Caesar more than him, and offers his dagger to Brutus, asking him to stab him in the chest because he cannot bear the misery.

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